Serving the Fullerton Community Since 1922

The Hornet

The Hornet

Serving the Fullerton Community Since 1922

The Hornet

Celebrating the Magic of Disney with Pins

Photos by Logan Martinez. Reporting by Corinna Ortega.

You can showcase any Disney theme with a shirt or hat, but the real fans wear pins. These small, button-like treasures can be enjoyed and exchanged with anyone, even cast members. Over 100,000 pins have been released, from character and attractions pins to limited edition and cast member only pins. “There are four types of pin traders: the sharks, emotional traders, value for value and trading just to trade,” states Taylor Hill who’s been trading since last January.  The trading possibilities are endless.

 

A young lady has many pins to choose from while perusing her options.
Pin trading tips and etiquette: So you’d like to be a part of the culture? Welcome! Please keep all arms, feet and legs to yourself. Ask before touching and don’t assume everyone has to accept your trades. Only cast members are required to trade. Remember, everyone here comes for the fun and enjoyment of pin trading, so have fun!
Pins are available at stands as well.
Pins are not just for collecting, but for showing off as well.
Matthew and Michael Sanchez flash their backpacks covered in StarWars pins as they head into the parks where the magic awaits.
A young lady shows off her pin collection.
This isn’t just a hobby, but a lifestyle—an opportunity to aesthetically announce yourself, representing your favorite characters, Disneystyle.
Pin trading is a serious ordeal. It may be a whimsical Disney pastime, but people have gone out of their way to cheat the system. With fake replicas out there, people on social media like Facebook, Twitter and Reddit have emerged to help tell pins apart. Various groups are online for members to come together and discuss everything from fake pins to ones they are looking for.
One couple, Taylor Hill and Tim Matthews, started collecting in 2017. They regularly commute three hours to the Happiest Place to collect pins. Recently in 2019, they decided to start trading and selling as well. “You always need to know the value of your pin that way you don’t get taken advantage of,” they advise, “We both had to learn the hard way…we have both invested easily $10,000 if not more in pins. So knowing your pin value is truly important.”
A portrait creatively displays the Cinderella pin set located in Disney’s California Adventure; this classic tale celebrates 70 years since its release.
Stitch is remaking the iconic Steamboat Willy in this pin.
Some people need many cases to keep their variety of pins safe.
Prices for starter pins range from $10 to $30, but limited edition and rare releases can go as high as $300.
A limited edition Big Hero 6 pin shows Fred’s suit blowing fire.
Disney pins have been around since the park’s opening in 1955, but in 1999 Disney began actively promoting the tradition of trading pins to celebrate the new millennium. After 20 years, it’s developed beyond tradition and into a community for everyone of any age to come together and experience the magic and joy it brings.