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The Hornet

Serving the Fullerton Community Since 1922

The Hornet

Elections 2020: CA Proposition Results

Prop 15:

California residents voted against increasing property taxes to fund schools and government agencies with opposition from 51.7% of voters. All commercial and industrial properties will remain taxed based on their original purchase price.

If passed, Proposition 15 would have increased property taxes for commercial and industrial properties worth more than $3 million. The increased tax revenue would have gone to education and local governments.
If passed, Proposition 15 would have increased property taxes for commercial and industrial properties worth more than $3 million. The increased tax revenue would have gone to education and local governments. Photo credit: Myron Caringal

Prop 16:

California residents voted against affirmative action with opposition from 56.1%. Affirmative action will remain banned in California in regards to the workplace.

If passed, Proposition 16 would make affirmative action legal again after 24 years. This would have repealed California’s Proposition 209, giving the opportunity for public agencies to give preference in admission or employment based on race, gender and ethnicity.
If passed, Proposition 16 would make affirmative action legal again after 24 years. This would have repealed California’s Proposition 209, giving the opportunity for public agencies to give preference in admission or employment based on race, gender and ethnicity. Photo credit: Myron Caringal

Prop 22:

California residents voted in favor of defining app-based transportation (rideshare) and delivery drivers as independent contractors with support from 58.4% of voters. This would keep app-based drivers as independent contractors while allowing limited benefits including payment of at least 120% of the minimum wage, health care subsidies and accident insurance.

If Proposition 22 didn't pass, contract workers would have been classified as employees under a new state law that allows them regular employee benefits such as overtime pay, healthcare and unemployment insurance.
If Proposition 22 didn’t pass, contract workers would have been classified as employees under a new state law that allows them regular employee benefits such as overtime pay, healthcare and unemployment insurance. Photo credit: Myron Caringal

Prop 18:
California residents voted against allowing 17 year-olds, who would be 18 by the time of the general election, to vote in the primary election by a majority of 55.1%. No changes will be made to the current laws and all voters must be 18 to participate in the primary elections that precede the general elections.

Californians voted against allowing 17 year-olds to have the right to vote before the general election.
Californians voted against allowing 17 year-olds to have the right to vote before the general election. Photo credit: Myron Caringal

Prop 21:

This prop did not pass as 59.8% of the California population voted against the local governments being able to enact rent control. No changes will be made to the rent laws currently in effect for housing that was first occupied after February 1, 1995, and housing units that have distinct titles, such as those of single-family homes.

Prop 21, if passed, would allow local government to create rent control. It did not pass with Californians.
Prop 21, if passed, would allow local government to create rent control. It did not pass with Californians. Photo credit: Myron Caringal
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