Fullerton Art Walk Celebrates Third Anniversary

Suleymi Recinos

Originally written for publishing on March 5, 2013.

Downtown Fullerton celebrated the third anniversary of the Art Walk at the Fullerton Museum Plaza on Friday, March 1, coming together as a community for appreciation of the arts.

Attendees were able to enjoy several methods of art from visual art, music and dance, theater, comedy and live screen-printing. A beer and wine garden, food trucks and kid’s corner were also present at the festival. The event was open to the general public of all ages and was free of charge.

Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva arrived to grant certificates of recognition and commend those who have contributed to the art walk, through the introduction of different arts, connection of the community and the overall help of local businesses.

Bands such as The Audacity, the Deep Sea Madness and Stuffed Animal Baby played live music for attendees to enjoy. A photo booth was set up for attendees to take photos, food trucks selling crepes and burgers were parked ready to great all hungry visitors.

Several booths by sponsors, artists and other community members were set up throughout the entire walk. The Fullerton College humanities department was also present and promoted the upcoming French Film festival.

“Venues not normally part of the art walk like the Muckenthaler are here this year, so it was more diverse,” proclaimed Corky Nepomuceno, member of the Art Walk anniversary planning committee.

Major sponsors that helped to promote and support the event included KCET Art Bound, CF Dance Academy, Fullerton Museum Center, MG Disposal and Roadkill Ranch and Boutique.

“I liked how it involved the community as a whole,” said Fullerton resident Jackie Neiman.

Children could also participate by making arts and crafts projects.

A coloring contest was held in connection with the Fullerton School District. Coloring sheets were distributed amongst the elementary schools with the third-year anniversary celebration logo for children to color and see it showcased at the event.

“It gives the community a sense of pride and unity,” said Nepomuceno.

Volunteers from the community helped to set up before and clean up after the event.

“It gives our citizens an opportunity to distinguish itself from the reputation of merely being a college drinking town,” said Nepomuceno.