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The Hornet

Serving the Fullerton Community Since 1922

The Hornet

Opinion: Biden requests $40 Billion more dollars for Ukraine amidst fires in Maui and Tropical Storm Hilary stateside

President Joe Biden leaves Hawaiians and Californians to fend for themselves against two major national disasters, as he requests more money for Ukraine. His globalist rhetoric is widely supported by Democrats, and even various GOP members.
The+decision+of+where+government+aid+should+go+between+the+war+in+the+Ukraine+and+the+back-to-back+natural+disasters+on+the+west+coast+seems+to+be+a+hotly+debated+topic+in+Congress.
Jake Rhodes
The decision of where government aid should go between the war in the Ukraine and the back-to-back natural disasters on the west coast seems to be a hotly debated topic in Congress.

Hurricanes and tropical storms were considered exclusively an east coast predicament before California, and many parts of Baja California, were hit with the first tropical storm the ‘Golden State’ had seen in nearly eight decades. Another west coast state also dealt with extreme cases of weather, when Maui was hit with wildfires that burned down the entire town of Lahaina.

On Sunday Aug. 20, four inches of rain engulfed San Diego and much of Southern California, as streets turned into rivers, power lines toppled, and houses crumbled in the heavy rain. In this disastrous weather, one would assume the American government would not hesitate to provide humanitarian aid to Californians due to the tropical storm.

That optimistic rationale did not materialize, as President Biden leading up to the storm, requested further emergency humanitarian aid from Congress to support Ukraine, while the Federal Emergency Management Agency warned the president that their disaster relief funds would be extinguished after Tropical Storm Hilary.

The FEMA administrator, Deanne Criswell, mentioned in CNN’s, “State of the Union,” that while the agency maintained emergency funds to help with the tropical storm, FEMA would struggle to assist with national emergencies in the future.

“We are seeing the increase in extreme weather events, but it’s not just the increase in number of events, but severity,” said Criswell.

But the political low bar does not stop there. While California dealt with the rain elements, Hawai’i tackled a polar opposite environmental predicament, wildfires. Leading up to and during Tropical Storm Hilary, Maui County officials went on to claim that the largest electric utility in Hawai’i, Hawaiian Electric, is responsible for the wildfires, and a lawsuit has been filed accusing the company of intentional wrongdoings.

While the wildfires have reportedly killed 115 Americans thus far, and have left thousands homeless, Criswell reports that FEMA has dispensed just north of eight million dollars in humanitarian aid to roughly 8,000 Hawaiian families, and a portion of that eight million dollar fund was allocated directly to rental assistance.

However, affected families have taken their frustrations to social media, claiming that they’re not seeing meaningful assistance from the government. One Hawaiian woman went to TikTok and Instagram and claimed that she and her family only received $700 in aid and gave the president her two cents on the matter.

This reality is not surprising. The Biden Administration, similarly to the Donald Trump Administration, started with campaign promises that claimed the government would give Americans the world, but gave us crumbs, instead.

Policies created to allocate funds that are going to support a good cause are something most American taxpayers may not mind paying for. However, when you see the president choose to ask about more aid to Ukraine first before helping Americans suffering from the fallout of Tropical Storm Hilary and the Maui fires, taxpayers will want to know where those funds are actually going.

It further demonstrates to the American public that​ there is no logical reason to trust our government; this premise of wanting low government involvement and distrust of the government is a foundational conservative and de facto Republican principle, which is why it will hurt the Biden-Harris ticket in 2024.

Regardless, the Biden Administration does not seem to care. Rather, the 46th president has requested more aid to Ukraine, while his citizens lost their homes due to extreme cases of weather on the U.S. western front. The $113 Billion in aid that President Biden has supplied Ukraine further demonstrates his globalist policy is the main focus going into the 2024 elections.

The Biden Administration released a statement further verbalizing support for Ukrainian efforts against Russia on Aug. 24, which is internationally recognized as Ukraine Independence Day. While Democrats in Washington are completely unified in their supportive Ukraine rhetoric, Republicans have been divided on Ukraine’s humanitarian relief policies.

GOP members, such as Trump, and rising 2024 presidential candidate, Vivek Ramaswamy, have spoken out against why there is such a need to keep aiding Ukraine.

Other GOP members, such as the 2024 presidential candidate Nikki Haley, however, have been in complete opposition to Russian sentiments. The former UN Ambassador and South Carolina governor Haley was recently and famously quoted, in the first Republican primary debate, claiming that, “A win for Russia is a win for China.”

The argument, on both sides, is whether America is willing to let Russia’s imperialistic ambitions spread further west or continue to send billions to Ukraine, a non-NATO ally, in a war that still is not settled and can go either way.

This imbalance of rhetoric and policy from the GOP is not something the American voter is going to take lightly in the 2024 elections. A recent CNN poll, released ahead of Biden’s request for more aid, showed that most Americans are against giving more support to Ukraine. Specifically, 55% of Americans believe Congress should not provide further aid against 45% who wish Congress should grant more aid.

It is quite surprising that established GOP members would exhibit support for Ukraine. Most of the GOP candidates that debated in the first 2023 GOP debate were widely in support of Trump’s, “America First” agenda; where the former president promised the restoration of American jobs and being tougher on eastern adversaries, Russia, China, and North Korea. It is a fundamental conservative belief in putting America and the interests of American taxpayers first. Further Ukrainian-supportive eloquence would be ideologically dishonest to any politician who calls themselves conservative and Republican.

Rhetoric in support of Ukraine creates the perception that elitist politicians in Washington, on both sides of the political aisle, wish to open up American public policy to globalist efforts. Meanwhile, on American soil, Californians watched their streets turn into rivers and Hawaiians saw their island burned to a crisp while Biden sent support to non-American citizens abroad.

Democrats and Republicans, alike, in this Ukrainian-Russian conflict, are demonstrating to the American taxpayer that the American government is far more concerned with supporting citizens of a non-NATO country, before ever batting an eye with humanitarian issues on the home front. What these globalist American politicians do not understand is that they have little say in whether they receive the nomination and election to the White House in 2024. The American taxpayer holds the reins to elect whichever candidate holds their political, civil, moral, and ethical principles.

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About the Contributors
CJ Womack
CJ Womack, Staff Reporter
Ché Womack Jr. (CJ) is a first semester staff reporter on The Hornet. After freelancing on Substack and writing his own political-opinion pieces, CJ joined The Hornet to further develop his journalistic abilities. CJ is the producer for The Hornet’s podcast, ‘Around The Hornet,’ and produces two other podcasts: "Two Nobodies With A Mic" and "Cut The Noise." He is interested in pursuing a career in journalism, endeavoring to be a political commentator for any major news corporation.
Jake Rhodes
Jake Rhodes, Editor-in-Chief
Jake Rhodes is the Editor-in-Chief for The Hornet Newspaper. He has been on The Hornet Newspaper for four semesters. He is an eight-time award winning journalist. He has received second place in Sports Game Story as well as Meritorious recognition in Enterprise News Story/Series for an investigation into Title IX concerns at Fullerton College from JACC. Jake is also a national CMA Pinnacle award winner, receiving first place in Sports Multimedia Story, second place in Sports Investigative Story, and Honorable Mention for Sports Game Story. In addition from CMA, he received an Honorable Mention for Best Web Sports Section while serving as Sports Editor in spring 2023. He has also received an honorable mention as producer of Around the Hornet for Audio Podcast and a third place finish as a contributor for Audio Podcast from JACC. While Jake has served as EIC, The Hornet secured its first ACP Online Pacemaker award, which has been referred to as the "Pulitzer of college media." The Hornet has also been recognized for "General Excellence: Online News Site" by JACC in both semesters Jake has served as EIC. He was also elected to be the new JACC SoCal Student Representative for all JACC members in Southern California for 2024-2025. Outside of The Hornet, Jake is an assistant coach with the Varsity Boys' basketball team at Fullerton Union High School and is also a bartender at Lucille's Smokehouse BBQ. His end goal in Journalism is to be a beat writer for an MLB or NBA team, or a sportscaster. Jake enjoys spending time with his wife Alexis, daughters Samantha, Madison, and dog Cocoa.

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